Science & Technology

During the Industrial Revolution, many “dark Satanic mills” arose to scar the English landscape. But in Gloucestershire, writes Esther A.L. Moir, home of the cloth industry, commerce and the art of architecture achieved a happy compromise.

During the years before the French Revolution, writes D.M. Walmsley, Mesmer’s treatment of patients by 'animal magnetism' in some ways foreshadowed the methods of modern pyschiatry.

Engineer, journalist, inventor, Herbert Spencer became one of the most influential prophets of the Victorian Age. J.W. Burrow describes how his Synthetic Philosophy was an encyclopedic attempt to construct a system of “unified knowledge,” in which the facts of Darwinian natural science were blended with transcendental metaphysics.

W.H. Chaloner offers a study in British railway engineering.

At the end of the eighteenth century the Russians were in want of technologists. Eric Robinson describes how they turned for help to the engineering skills of Birmingham.

“What is the American, this new man?,” Franklin seemed to provide the answer to this question first asked in 1784.

G.G. Hatheway describes how British-Canadian and American companies entered upon a nineteenth century contest in transatlantic crossings.

The third President of the United States had been the first American Minister in Paris; Stuart Andrews describes how, to the end of his life, he was a faithful disciple of the French Enlightenment.

In the year after ‘Mr. Madison’s War’, writes W.I. Cunningham, three Massachusetts businessmen helped to transfer the Industrial Revolution from England to America.

After long dispute between the Penn and Calvert families, writes Louis C. Kleber, the astronomers, Charles Mason and Jeremiah Dixon, sailed for America in November 1763 to lay down their momentous line.

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