Who's Who

Science & Technology

  • Map of the 1858 trans-Atlantic cable route
Editor's choice
By Philip Cowburn

Once the cable had at length been laid, writes Philip Cowburn, ‘an additional bond of union’, in the words of Queen Victoria’s message to President Andrew Johnson, strengthened the link between Great Britain and the United States.

The discoverer of oxygen - a man of ‘singular energy and varied abilities’ - was, writes A.D. Orange, also a bold progressive thinker.

Darwin’s cousin in the nineteenth century, writes C.H. Corning, was a daring explorer of the world and a pioneer in the scientific study of racial qualities.

‘A sort of giant’, with immensely long arms and legs and a mop of bristling red hair, Felix Nadar employed his creative gifts in several different arts and sciences. By Joanna Richardson.

Joanna Richardson describes the life and work of the French father of science fiction.

In 1785, writes Mary Beth Norton, a Loyalist physician from Boston made the first aerial flight across the English Channel.

Brunel's crossing opened on December 8th, 1864.

C. Northcote Parkinson traces the development of the tin mining and plating processes, from Chinese joss-sticks, to the modern tin can.

Christopher Lloyd traces the development of naval missile technology alongside the often adverse reactions these “infernal machines” provoked.

Did physics make the torpedo possible? Barry Parker’s book, The Physics of War, primarily an explanation of the principles of physics...

Describing the First World War as ‘an engineers’ war’, which required ‘arms more than men’, Lloyd George acted on the urgent need to employ women in the armaments industries. Henrietta Heald explains how they in turn responded to the challenges.

Recent stories