Philosophy

Do Stoic philosophy and the family mix? The writings of Seneca show how the model Stoic, relying on nothing but his own mind, can still be a loving family man. 

The priestesses of the Oracle at Delphi played a pivotal role in the religious life of the ancient Greek world, connecting the human to the divine. 

What is the soul, where does it come from and where does it go when we die? Such questions have continued to fascinate since the early modern period. The answers that were produced were never decisive, but were often surprisingly creative, as Richard Sugg demonstrates.

During the second half of the eighteenth century, writes Stuart Andrews, there existed close and important ties between American and French thinkers.

Catherine’s cordial relations with the greatest thinkers of her day were no mistake, writes A. Lentin, but an integral part of her statecraft.

From Roman times to the present age of American dominance, writes Brian Bond, philosophers, jurists and men of state have tried to answer the question: ‘When is war just?’

Thomas D. Mahoney discusses the character, career and present-day importance of the great political philosopher.

In France, Fourier's ideas on social and economic reform have been used as weapons in the battles of the co-operative and syndicalist movements. Today, a new attempt is being made to disinter the man and his thought from traditions and myths.

Educationalist. Co-operator. Capitalist. Utopian. W.H. Oliver describes how Robert Owen was doomed to foster ideas and programmes which caused him considerable distress.

Hotman and Bodin were among those who laid down new lines of political thought in Europe, writes J.H.M. Salmon.