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Music

  • W.S. Gilbert, 1878
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By Ian Bradley

Ian Bradley examines the achievements of the surprisingly radical Victorian dramatist and librettist who, in collaboration with the composer Arthur Sullivan, created classic satires of English national identity.

Understanding aboriginal history through rare and largely unheard music.

In 1923 Richard Wagner’s son, Siegfried, appealed to Bayreuth Festival audiences to refrain from responding to Hans Sachs’ paean to ‘holy German...

The recently opened Sam Wanamaker Theatre marks an intriguing step forward in the revival of baroque opera, says Mark Ronan. 

Owain Edwards writes about the sea change in classical music composition - and listenership - as the galant music of the Bachs reached London.

Beethoven's only opera was performed for the first time on May 23rd, 1814.

Joanna Richardson describes how after he had moved to Paris, Jacques Offenbach, the son of a cantor at the synagogue in Cologne, created an operatic epitome of the Second Empire.

The history of the Bayreuth Festival, the annual celebration of the music of Richard Wagner, is mired in controversy and scandal, as Mark Ronan reports.

J.S. Curtis charts the development of stringed keyboard instruments from the virginal and spinet, to the ‘forte-piano’.

Aileen Ribeiro describes the masquerades and concerts that took place in eighteenth century Soho, as devised by the socialite, opera singer, and adventuress from Vienna. 

Aram Bakshian Jr. profiles a true Venetian, Lorenzo Da Ponte, who, like his associate Casanova, had an extravagant and boldly adventurous career.

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