This pacy book is a whistle-stop tour of what the dust jacket calls our ‘dark history’, namely the ruthless pursuit of profit at the expense of...

On its 75th anniversary, Philip Weir remembers Britain’s first attempt to smash a major hydroelectric dam: the bombardment of Genoa in 1941.

The Mediterranean, as a world in itself or as a gateway to other worlds, old and new, has been much studied. For the period covered by the book...

Though attention this year has been focused on the bicentenary of the Battle of Waterloo, the decisive blows that defeated Napoleon were landed at sea, says James Davey. 

From luxury liners to troopships: Roland Quinault examines the close relationship between the Cunard line and Winston Churchill.

Britons like to think that they all pulled together during the Second World War, but as Clive Emsley shows, some of the work force, in particular those employed in the nation’s ports, were just as likely to be pulling a fast one.

On the anniversary of its dramatic sinking, Philip Weir revisits the controversy surrounding the mysterious events of that fateful day.

Chiefly remembered as Darwin’s captain on HMS Beagle, Robert FitzRoy's life was an eventful one.

Robin Bruce Lockhart traces the development of Russia's fleets, from the Napoleonic era to the Soviet period.

On the morning of October 21st, 1805, writes Christopher Lloyd, Nelson’s crushing defeat of the combined naval forces of France and Spain won for Britain an unchallenged mastery of the seas that was to last for over a hundred years.