Literature

 Jerome de Groot highlights some recent historical fiction, en-route encountering Eleanor of Aquitaine, Johannes Gutenberg, Simón Bolívar and the spirit of Marcel Proust.

Carroll’s perceived paedophilia seems to have little scholarly evidence.

In his long series of novels, Galdos presents a vision of Spanish history from Napoleonic times until the 1880s. By Douglas Hilt.

Poet Laureate from 1850, writes Joanna Richardson, Tennyson became an acknowledged interpreter of Victorian morals and politics.

Joanna Richardson describes how the diarists of the early nineteenth century wrote some highly distinctive memoirs of politics and Court life.

The idea of writing about what we can never know – the interior lives of people other than ourselves – was born within the fertile hybrid culture of 12th-century England.

During the eighteenth century female authors became increasingly numerous and industrious; while as readers, writes Robert Halsband, thanks to the spread of the new circulating libraries, women began to form ‘a significant sector’ of the literary public.

Joanna Richardson describes the life and work of the French father of science fiction.

In his memoirs Chateaubriand denounces Napoleon. But, asks Douglas Hilt, is it not a figure of grandeur and vision that emerges?

For the 18-century tourist, there was a strange beauty in rugged industrial landscapes, which moved them to quote poetry and dash off pages of vivid descriptive prose.