Who's Who

Historiography

Editor's choice
By Blair Worden

Supreme stylist, polymath, linguist and scourge of specialisation, Hugh Trevor-Roper, whose centenary falls this month, continues to divide opinions. Blair Worden considers his life and legacy.

Fifty years on from Winston Churchill’s death, Chris Wrigley surveys the literature available, highlighting key works and lesser-known titles.

Every generation, writes E.E.Y. Hales, will have to consider afresh the principles of selection and the paths that may be usefully followed.

Historians should adhere to a rigorous code of professional practice if they are to avoid the kinds of careless mistakes that bring their professional integrity into question, says Suzannah Lipscomb.

A.L. Rowse describes the life and career of the foremost Persian and Sanskrit scholar of his day.

Thomas Penn and his colleagues have embarked on a project to publish a series of short biographies of England’s and, subsequently, Britain’s monarchs. Why is the study of kings and queens still relevant in our less than deferential age?

Maurice Ashley offers a tribute and reassessment of Sir Charles Harding Firth, the great historian of England in the seventeenth century.

Today it is hardly possible to equate the Italian Renaissance with the modern world, as Burckhardt did a century ago. But, argues Denys Hay, his discerning study has helped to transform the Western attitude to the past, and its influence remains profound.

Daniel Snowman asks whether historical biography can be considered a serious contribution to history and assesses the latest trends in the field.

In the first of an ocassional series on classic history books, Daniel Swift revisits Paul Fussell's The Great War and Modern Memory

From 1774 to 1827, writes Adrian Bury, the ordinary Englishman and woman were drawn from life by Rowlandson with incomparable industry and vigour.

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