Who's Who

Historical Memory

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By Edgar Feuchtwanger

As a boy growing up in Munich Edgar Feuchtwanger witnessed the rise of Germany’s dictator at extraordinarily close range.

Paul Lay reflects on the differences between his generation and that of his grandfather, who fought in the First World War.

“It is time that the abuse of his enemies should be appreciated in its true light, and not accepted as impartial history merely because they happened to be distinguished men.” By Theodore Zeldin.

A.P. Ryan describes how, each Easter, the Irish Republic commemorates the fiftieth anniversary of the April Rising in Dublin when a short-lived Provisional Government of the Republic was proclaimed.

John Raymond offers the picturesque records of an amiable spendthrift who lived through the greater part of one of the most eventful centuries of English history.

David G. Chandler offers a study in fact and fiction about a famous Napoleonic campaign.

David Chandler describes how visiting old battlefields has become a holiday attraction for many tourists besides old soldiers.

Europe knew little about black Africa, writes Steven R. Smith, until the trading voyages of the late sixteenth century.

In the New Testament layers of tradition overlay accounts of John the Baptist. J.K. Elliott describes how these accounts were imposed by writers who altered historical details to suit their own doctrinal ends.

During the mid-nineteenth century, writes Stuart D. Goulding, Judge James McDonald, a Westchester attorney with a keen interest in the past, collected from a large number of elderly survivors their personal recollections of the American Revolutionary War as it had affected ordinary men and women.

Victory over the tribesmen on the North-west frontier of British India, writes James Lunt, is still commemorated by Sikh regiments.

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