Historical Memory

Is it ahistorical for public figures to say sorry for events that took place before they were born? The issue cuts to the heart of the relationship between the living and the dead.

This SLIM book is an extended assault on the often catastrophic consequences of collective memory. Against the current mantra that nations, like...

Since the Iliad, war has inspired stories – mixing fact and fiction – which reveal as much, if not more, about the realities of conflict as academic studies. John E. Talbott examines writing about ‘the human condition at its most extreme’.

The meaning of revolution is ever-changing. David Armitage shows how events in recent history have caused a revolution in the meaning of revolution. 

As interesting as counterfactualism may be, we must be careful with its use. Paul Dukes warns against placing undue reliance on what might happen at the expense of what did.  

“It is time that the abuse of his enemies should be appreciated in its true light, and not accepted as impartial history merely because they happened to be distinguished men.” By Theodore Zeldin.

A.P. Ryan describes how, each Easter, the Irish Republic commemorates the anniversary of the April Rising in Dublin when a short-lived Provisional Government of the Republic was proclaimed.

John Raymond offers the picturesque records of an amiable spendthrift who lived through the greater part of one of the most eventful centuries of English history.

David G. Chandler offers a study in fact and fiction about a famous Napoleonic campaign.

David Chandler describes how visiting old battlefields has become a holiday attraction for many tourists besides old soldiers.