Gender

The British newspaper revolutionised the market by appealing to female readers, even though its attitude towards sexual politics has often been ambivalent, argues Adrian Bingham.

In the 18th century, when women in scholarship were not encouraged and medieval languages were little-studied even by men, Elizabeth Elstob become a pioneer in Anglo-Saxon studies, her work even finding its way into the hands of Thomas Jefferson.

Amy Fuller looks at the life of the Mexican nun Sor Juana Inés de la Cruz and asks why we feel the need to kill our heroines rather than celebrate their achievements.

Exactly who were the ‘perfect wives’ of the 1950s? Were they the drably dressed women still queuing for food up to a decade after the Second World...

Diaries can be a holy grail for the historian: written with the immediacy of the moment, capturing the authentic atmosphere of an event,...

Travelling across America in the 1970s, Jad Adams chanced upon a statue of the suffrage...

This is an extract from Anna Field’s ‘Masculinity and Myth’, which won the 2014 History Today undergraduate dissertation prize, awarded in conjunction with the Royal Historical Society.

Walter L. Arnstein offers a study of the movement for female emancipation, from the 1860s until 1918.

Helen McCarthy’s latest book is one of the most important studies on diplomatic practice to have been published in many years. It is the first...

Edna Nixon describes how Mary Wollstonecraft became a passionate believer in the education of her own sex, having herself suffered intensely as a woman.

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