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Gender

Walter L. Arnstein offers a study of the movement for female emancipation, from the 1860s until 1918.

Helen McCarthy’s latest book is one of the most important studies on diplomatic practice to have been published in many years. It is the first...

Edna Nixon describes how Mary Wollstonecraft became a passionate believer in the education of her own sex, having herself suffered intensely as a woman.

A BBC drama from 1974 highlights the tensions in writing feminist history.

Jad Adams considers the actions of the militant British suffragette movement and its far-reaching impact on the global struggle for female suffrage in the 20th century.

The Foreign Office was long a bastion of male chauvinism. Only during the Second World War did women diplomats begin to make their mark.

Henry Kamen describes the apotheosis of emancipated Russian womanhood.

This volume covers the roles and influence of ladies-in-waiting in the Tudor and Stuart courts, France, the Habsburg courts, in Vienna and the...

Joanne Bailey argues that gender history is no faddish digression from the historical route, but an advanced tool of analysis that is here to stay.

From all the evidence, writes Sudie Duncan Sides, it is abundantly clear that it was harder to be a slave than a plantation mistress; but the memoirs of the time do not admit this.

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