Education

The First World War transformed women-only Somerville College. It became a hospital for convalescing soldiers, housed poets and writers and changed forever the fortunes of female students, writes Frank Prochaska. 

Schoolboys forget their books, lose their pens and laugh at dirty jokes. This was true even in the rigorous atmosphere of the Anglo-Saxon classroom.

One of the 19th-century pioneers of education for the working class is emerging from neglect.

Bell is most known for the invention of the first patented telephone, but his work on deafness and speech sounds should not be forgotten.

Joanna Richardson describes how, in 1865, Miss Buss told a School Enquiry Commission: 'I am sure that the girls can learn anything they are taught in an interesting manner.’

Barbara Scott describes how a tutor to royal princesses and to the Bonaparte family, Henriette Campan, became a pioneer of girl's education in France.

Every generation, writes E.E.Y. Hales, will have to consider afresh the principles of selection and the paths that may be usefully followed.

During the eighteenth century, writes Bill Hooper, ‘barbaric anarchy’ reigned at Eton.

Tim Hitchcock sets out on an online archival journey, seeking high-quality, free resources for researchers, especially those working on British history.

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