Who's Who

Education

Barbara Scott describes how a tutor to royal princesses and to the Bonaparte family, Henriette Campan, became a pioneer of girl's education in France.

Every generation, writes E.E.Y. Hales, will have to consider afresh the principles of selection and the paths that may be usefully followed.

During the eighteenth century, writes Bill Hooper, ‘barbaric anarchy’ reigned at Eton.

Tim Hitchcock sets out on an online archival journey, seeking high-quality, free resources for researchers, especially those working on British history.

Teaching at Christ’s Hospital dates from 1552, writes N.M. Plumley, and its Royal Mathematical School from the reign of Charles II.

The furore over Michael Gove's plans for the English curriculum shows our collective amnesia over our rich sources of literature and history, writes Paul Lay.

Herbert Butterfield describes the origins of the Historical Association and its influence on the teaching of history in Britain.

Gifted; energetic; passionate; unruly: Hamilton was “perhaps the most creative figure thrown up by the American Revolution.” By Esmond Wright.

The Education Act of 1870 was a landmark in Liberal policy, writes Paul Adelman, but it failed to satisfy the Nonconformist conscience of many Liberal supporters.

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