Rhodesia’s white minority government declared unilateral independence from the UK in 1965, gaining covert support from France, Britain’s colonial rival in Africa, as Joanna Warson explains.

From 1848 until 1867, writes E.R.R. Green, the romantic nationalists of Ireland, with strong backing from the Irish-Americans, conspired in vain to make their country an “Independent Democratic Republic.”

Captain Boycott, whose name has added a word to the English language, was accepted as a symbol of the landlord class in troubled Ireland. By T.H. Corfe.

In 1987 Pakistan was widely regarded as being economically ahead of its much larger neighbour, India. Pakistan’s GDP was $390 per head compared...

‘If this Empire seems an evil thing to me, it is not because I hate the British, I hate only the Empire.’ B.G. Gokhale offered an assessment of Gandhi upon the centenary of his birth.

J.D. Hargreaves introduces a prophet of nationalism in the coastal countries of West Africa.

George Woodcock describes how the Imperial Conference of 1930, and accompanying events overseas, began the change of substantial empire into a shadowy Commonwealth.

Patrick Turnbull writes that the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, which opened on March 3rd, 1954, and continued until early May, marked the end not only of French, but of European hegemony in Asia.

The term ‘Chimurenga’ has various historical associations. It was originally used to describe the first rising against British rule of the 1890s; the Rhodesian Bush War of the 1970s is known as the Second Chimurenga. J.V. Woolford, writing as the Bush War was ongoing, puts the term in context.

Postwar decolonisation in West Africa saw tensions rise between the fading imperial powers of France and Britain, according to papers recently unearthed by Kathryn Hadley.


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