National Army Museum

Cultural

New US equality laws in the 1960s meant a revolution in journalism, as the women of the press fought for their place.

I admire the chutzpah of this book. At a time when discussion of Native American history is hotly contested as never before, J.C.H. King has...

An illuminating and scholarly study seeks to re-evaluate the intellectual and cultural history of an enlightened Ireland.

Were the...

Confronting the brutal facts of history can be difficult. But how far should we protect ourselves from them before it becomes censorship? 

An exhibition at the Bodleian Libraries, Oxford.

James G. Clark investigates the destruction of western Europe's medieval heritage during the First World War, as churches and cathedrals became targets, and how it made people think anew about their nations's pasts.

Michael Greenhalgh describes how Roman architecture and Graeco-Roman statues made a profound impression upon the great Renaissance artists.

Though he exercised little political influence, Victor Hugo’s genius and his ardent championship of liberty had made him a legendary figure long before his death.

The visit of the Baroque master in 1665, writes Michael Greenhalgh, coincided with a rejection of Italian influence by French taste.

In 1773, writes A. Lentin, the radical philosophe paid a difficult visit to his patroness in St Petersburg.