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Architecture

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By Bernard Porter

A mid-Victorian competition to design new Government Offices in Whitehall fell victim to a battle between the competing styles of Gothic and Classical. The result proved unworthy of a nation then at its imperial zenith.

One of the world's most famous bridges turns 120 years old this week. But its distinctive design almost didn't come to pass.

Leonard W. Cowie traces six centuries in the history of a former London barrier.

A vivid, colourful evocation of the city in AD 315.

Visitors to Venice sometimes notice a little porphyry statue outside San Marco – four warriors in flat-topped helmets who are embracing each other...

Just before lunchtime on September 1st, 1923 the Great Kanto earthquake subjected Tokyo, Yokohama and surrounding areas to almost five minutes of...

These two books, while dissimilar in most ways, are united by their interest in mass building projects that transformed the look and character of...

Andrew Higgott surveys the contested legacy of modern architecture in Britain from the first machine age to the dawn of the digital.

This elegantly conceived volume adds considerably to our knowledge and understanding of one of the most remarkable buildings to have been...

Eighteenth-century men of taste had begun to build themselves mock-medieval houses. Tudor Edwards writes how their descendants carried on the vogue by constructing a series of impressive castles.

First the mansion of the House of Lancaster, writes L.W. Cowie, then a hospital of the Tudors, the Savoy was once said to be the finest residence in England.

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