Who's Who

Architecture

Editor's choice
By Bernard Porter

A mid-Victorian competition to design new Government Offices in Whitehall fell victim to a battle between the competing styles of Gothic and Classical. The result proved unworthy of a nation then at its imperial zenith.

The remains of the Palace were almost completely destroyed by the fire of 1834 and, writes L.W. Cowie, the Houses of Parliament were rebuilt by Sir Charles Barry.

Briefly a royal palace, writes L.W. Cowie, Bridewell became a hospital, an apprentices’ school and a reformatory for vagrants and prostitutes.

L.W. Cowie takes the reader on a visit to a city monastery, for three hundred years associated with the Dominicans and, after the Reformation, with the theatre.

From 1831 until 1907, writes Leonard W. Cowie, Exeter Hall played a vital part in the ameliorative work of believers in human betterment.

The enticing title of this book unfortunately turns out to be something of a misnomer. Instead of hearing how key urban centres shaped the British...

Once the hall of Richard II’s palace, Westminster Hall became a centre of the British judicial system and, writes Leonard W. Cowie, a popular meeting-place for Londoners.

Architect and landscape-gardener to the sixth Duke of Devonshire, Paxton reached his highest fame in 1851 with the creation of the Crystal Palace, writes Tudor Edwards.

First built in the 1630s, writes Leonard W. Cowie, Leicester House became the London home of three eighteenth-century Princes of Wales.

On the Neva in 1740, writes Mina Curtiss, Peter the Great’s niece constructed a winter palace.

Philippa Joseph reviews an exhibition at the National Gallery, London.

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