Architecture

James G. Clark investigates the destruction of western Europe's medieval heritage during the First World War, as churches and cathedrals became targets, and how it made people think anew about their nations's pasts.

The stately, rhythmic elegance of Greek temple architecture has inspired generations of...

Images of the Norman castle, which was largely destroyed during the English Civil Wars. 

Near London Bridge, writes W.A. Speck, the Doric column to commemorate the Great Fire of 1666 was designed by Wren and made of Portland Stone.

The remains of the Palace were almost completely destroyed by the fire of 1834 and, writes L.W. Cowie, the Houses of Parliament were rebuilt by Sir Charles Barry.

Briefly a royal palace, writes L.W. Cowie, Bridewell became a hospital, an apprentices’ school and a reformatory for vagrants and prostitutes.

L.W. Cowie takes the reader on a visit to a city monastery, for three hundred years associated with the Dominicans and, after the Reformation, with the theatre.

From 1831 until 1907, writes Leonard W. Cowie, Exeter Hall played a vital part in the ameliorative work of believers in human betterment.

The enticing title of this book unfortunately turns out to be something of a misnomer. Instead of hearing how key urban centres shaped the British...

Once the hall of Richard II’s palace, Westminster Hall became a centre of the British judicial system and, writes Leonard W. Cowie, a popular meeting-place for Londoners.

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