Michael Everett takes issue with one of Mary C. Erler’s assumptions in her otherwise perceptive article from 2014 on Thomas Cromwell’s friendship with Abbess Margaret Vernon.

Suzannah Lipscomb looks beyond the stereotypes that surround our most infamous monarch to ask: who was Henry VIII and when did it all go wrong? 

What can explain the Scottish King's rash challenge to his uncle of England, Henry VIII, in 1542? In that year, writes Albert Makinson, a Scots army was destroyed on the borders of Cumberland, and James's throne passed to his daughter, Mary, before whom lay a tragic destiny.

Alan Haynes describes a gallant mercantile endeavour in Tudor relations with Spain.

First the mansion of the House of Lancaster, writes L.W. Cowie, then a hospital of the Tudors, the Savoy was once said to be the finest residence in England.

Henry VIII’s masterful administrator and reformer forged an unlikely friendship with a prioress, as Mary C. Erler explains.

In 1429, ‘with a pirouette and a trip’, Owain Tudur, a poor Welsh gentleman, fell into the lap of Henry V’s widow, whom he served as keeper of her...

During the Reformation, writes Christine King, Tudor agents demolished many venerated shrines, and made great use of the frauds and trickeries that they claimed to have detected.

James Marshall-Cornwall describes a Tudor adventure, ultimately unsuccessful: Willoughby perished on the Kola peninsula; Chancellor reached Moscow and was received by Ivan the Terrible.

David Starkey describes a small-scale, regional, sixteenth century event that, nonetheless, illuminates the age.



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