Roman Britain

In the year AD 60, Boudicca, a woman of the royal house of the Iceni led a fierce British revolt against the Roman occupation, during which Londinium was reduced to ashes.

Caesar once crossed the Thames on the back of an animal previously unseen by Britons. Here, C.E. Stevens assesses just how much of a historical anomaly this pairing was.

R.A.G. Carson investigates the fate of the polity established by rebel Roman general Carausius in the third century AD.

C.E. Stevens searches the elusive world of ancient Britain.

Rayner Heppenstall highlights the problems inherent in divisions of British and Irish history along racial lines.

David Mattingly revisits an article by Graham Webster, first published in History Today in 1980, offering a surprisingly sympathetic account of Roman imperialism.

The emperor Hadrian presided over the Roman empire at its height, defined its borders and was one of the most cultured rulers of the ancient world. Neil Faulkner revisits his legacy, as the British Museum opens a major exhibition on his life and times.

David Mattingly says it’s time to rethink the current orthodoxy and question whether Roman rule was good for Britain.

Richard Cavendish recalls May 17th, 1257.

Peter Furtado previews a major exhibition opening in York at the end of the month.