Roman Britain

In the year AD 60, Boudicca, a woman of the royal house of the Iceni led a fierce British revolt against the Roman occupation, during which Londinium was reduced to ashes.

Caesar once crossed the Thames on the back of an animal previously unseen by Britons. Here, C.E. Stevens assesses just how much of a historical anomaly this pairing was.

R.A.G. Carson investigates the fate of the polity established by rebel Roman general Carausius in the third century AD.

C.E. Stevens searches the elusive world of ancient Britain.

Rayner Heppenstall highlights the problems inherent in divisions of British and Irish history along racial lines.

In this month's edition: an Englishman in the Spanish Civil War, life in postwar Germany and the Romans who made Britain.

New mobile app allows user to discover the history of ancient Londinium.

The newly refurbished Roman Vindolanda Museum opened last weekend. It will be home to nine of the Vindolanda Tablets, the oldest surviving handwritten documents in Britain, on loan from the British Museum.

Caligula was assassinated on January 24th, AD 41. He reputedly slept with his sisters and wanted to appoint his horse a consul. But was Tiberius' successor really insane or did he simply struggle to deal with the unlimited power that he received at such a young age?

David Mattingly revisits an article by Graham Webster, first published in History Today in 1980, offering a surprisingly sympathetic account of Roman imperialism.