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Roman Britain

Editor's choice
By Simon Elliott

While the advances in technology and manufacturing that took place in Britain during  the 18th and 19th centuries have entered the mainstream of history, few know about the industrialisation carried out during the Roman occupation, says Simon Elliott.

A classic example of the pre-Reform Act ‘pocket borough’, L.W. Cowie describes how the uninhabited Salisbury town of Old Sarum did not lose its Parliamentary privileges until 1832.

J.B. Whitwell describes how a series of excavations since the Second World War has revealed much important detail about Lindum Colonia.

C.E. Carrington describes how, from London to York, and under a succession of Roman Governors, the great road to the north was built during the first century A.D.

Towards the end of the fourth century, writes David Jones, a Spanish emperor from Britain and his Welsh empress held their spendid court in a city on the Moselle.

Colin Martin describes how, on the frontiers of Caledonia eighteen centuries ago, the Romans kept watch from camp and wall over turbulent northern tribes.

In the year A.D. 60, Boudicca, a woman of the royal house of the Iceni—now popularly renowned as Queen Boadicea—led a fierce British revolt against the Roman occupation during which Londinium was reduced to ashes. By B.R. Dudley.

Caesar once crossed the Thames on the back of an animal previously unseen by Britons. Here, C.E. Stevens assesses just how much of a historical anomaly this pairing was.

R.A.G. Carson investigates the fate of the polity established by rebel Roman general Carausius in the third century AD.

C.E. Stevens searches the elusive world of ancient Britain.

Rayner Heppenstall highlights the problems inherent in divisions of British and Irish history along racial lines.

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