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Renaissance

Today it is hardly possible to equate the Italian Renaissance with the modern world, as Burckhardt did a century ago. But, argues Denys Hay, his discerning study has helped to transform the Western attitude to the past, and its influence remains profound.

Philippa Joseph reviews an exhibition at the National Gallery, London.

David Rundle looks at the current state of the humanities, asking whether we can recapture the confidence and broad cultural ambition of the Renaissance’s studia humanitatis, which sought to define what it is to be human.

Sick building syndrome is familiar to us all: the feeling of malaise that can be suffered by people working and living in poor indoor environments...

Though he had begun life as an energetic mercenary soldier, writes Alan Haynes, the Duke of Urbino became a celebrated humanist and a generous patron of contemporary art and learning.

Francis J. Bremer introduces a true Renaissance man; Thomas Hariot, man of action and ideas.

A veteran of Poitiers, writes Neil Ritchie, John Hawkwood served as a mercenary in Italy; twenty years in the service of Florence.

Although Catherine de Medici’s name is well known, many of the women of the French Renaissance court may be unfamiliar to British readers. Yet in...

The Renaissance in Italy, writes Alan Haynes, was enhanced by the arrival of scholars from Byzantium towards the end of the fourteenth century.

Nicholas Henshall examines the politics of aristocratic culture in Europe between 1650 and 1750.

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