R.W. Brockway presents palaeolithic man as an accomplished artist.

S.G.F. Brandon describes how the earliest representatives of mankind were concerned with three fundamental problems— birth, death and the supply of food—which they attempted to solve by magico-religious means.

S.G.F. Brandon explains how, from the religious conceptions of the ancient Hebrew people, sprang the traditional idea of how mankind originated.

The myth of the “Dark Continent” has recently been exploded by archaeologists. A rich indigenous culture was established long before the coming of the white man. The memorials that it left behind are here described and appraised by Robert A. Kennedy.

Had these early artists a purely practical aim? Or were they inspired by a true creative impulse? “This conflict” writes Jacquetta Hawkes, “exists only in the mind of the disputants.”

Jacquetta Hawkes explains how, at an unpromising period in human history, a sudden upsurge of creative power produced the earliest masterpieces of European art.

Between the years 1300 and 600 B.C. the virile kingdom of Ararat rose to be a large empire, M. Chahin writes, which long held the Assyrians at bay.

Rayner Heppenstall highlights the problems inherent in divisions of British and Irish history along racial lines.

Certain mysteries of pre-Saxon Britain are decoded by Jacquetta Hawkes 

Geoffrey Grigson explores how a variety of views of Stonehenge has surfaced, and re-surfaced, in popular literature over time.



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