Without dexterity and imagination historians are in danger of overlooking the telling details that complete the bigger picture, argues Mathew Lyons.

The playwright was baptised on February 26th, 1564.

Daisy Dunn reviews an exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Francis J. Bremer introduces a true Renaissance man; Thomas Hariot, man of action and ideas.

Lansing Collins describes how, in honour of a previous gift sent in the other direction, Elizabeth I presented Sultan Mohammed III with an elaborate clock, surmounted by singing birds that shook their wings.

Alan Haynes describes how, in 1567, permission for the holding of ‘a very rich Lottery General’ was granted by English government.

Tracked down to a ‘hut in the cavern of a rock’, writes J.J.N. McGurk, Desmond met his death at the hands of fellow Irishmen.

D.E. Moss introduces a Cambridge scholar who was tutor to Princess Elizabeth, an observant traveller in Germany and the author of books on archery and education.

Alan Haynes describes how Italian scholars, merchants and craftsmen were welcomed in Elizabethan London and enjoyed high patronage.

Susan C. Shapiro describes how a struggle for women’s liberation began about 1580 and continued in Jacobean years.



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