University of Cambridge


Far from a static system, Anglo-Saxon personal names reflected societal changes.

Schoolboys forget their books, lose their pens and laugh at dirty jokes. This was true even in the rigorous atmosphere of the Anglo-Saxon classroom.

Eleanor Parker's blog takes in an astoundingly wide range of subjects relating to Anglo-Saxon and Scandinavian history and literature

The use and re-use of Anglo-Saxon stone carvings as gravestones, bricks and horse troughs. 

After the Romans left and the Anglo-Saxons arrived, the south-west of England became the predominant kingdom. William Seymour traces the growth of the Kingdom of Wessex from the early sixth century.

Dianne Ebertt Beeaff explains the disappearance from view of Anglo-Saxon family names from modern English life.

Timothy Wilson Smith describes how, in the year 878, Alfred witnessed the conversion to Christianity of the Danish warlord Guthrum, and helped to found the English nation.

Four years after William I's conquest of England, writes J.J.N. McGurk, a Lincolnshire thegn named Hereward led a fierce resistance movement against Norman rule.

W.N. Bryant introduces Bede, the ‘Father of English History’, a Northumbrian Monk who devoted his life to study, teaching and church services.

Was King Harold slain by a Norman arrow that pierced his eye? Charles H. Gibbs-Smith adduces a powerful argument for correcting the traditional story. 


The New App

Download Now