Who's Who

Angevin

For the cogent reasons explained here by Anthony Beadles, the revolt against King John was led largely by the Northern barons.

Anthony Dent describes how this rich French province remained a royal English vineyard for a good three centuries.

A. Compton Reeves describes the events of 1435, the year when the rule of the house of Lancaster began to decline in England as well as France.

J.L. Kirby describes an episode in the long struggle of the English Kings to keep their fiefs as Dukes of Aquitaine.

Hugh Ross Williamson describes how, in the fierce dynastic struggles of the later fifteenth century, Edward IV’s brother, George Plantagenet, played a devious and ill-fated part.

Albert Makinson offers a study of Edward II's “over-mighty subject” who, having suffered a violent death as a rebel against the King, became a popular hero and a strong candidate for canonization.

Alex R. Myers introduces the conciliatory and resourceful, hard-working and generousthe brother of Henry V, who was both an able soldier and a gifted Regent of France. Even his treatment of St. Joan by contemporary standards seems neither harsh nor dishonourable.

A.H. Burne analyses the key factors that led to what would be a major victory in the Hundred Years' War.

The King of Aragon was deeply involved in the religious wars of the thirteenth century in south-western France, writes Jan Read.

Arthur Bryant continues his series by examining the background to the Magna Carta.

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