Who's Who

Southeast Asia

Geoffrey Evans describes how British and Indian forces recovered Burma from the Japanese during the Second World War.

British Malaya since 1786 has become the home of many different races, whose harmonious union, writes C. Northcote Parkinson, would offer an example from which the rest of the world might profit.

A foothold in Siam offered new trading opportunities for France in the late 17th century, as well as a chance to spread the Catholic faith. Peter Murrell describes French efforts via a series of embassies between the two countries.

George Woodcock gives an account of an Imperial enterprise in south-east Asia.

For twenty-five years, writes Robert Bruce, King Mindon preserved a peaceful and progressive atmosphere in nineteenth-century Burma.

The connexions of the French with Vietnam began in the eighteenth century; D.R. Watson describes how their legacy was passed to the United States in 1954.

A.J. Stockwell examines the life and work of the British in Malaya before independence was declared, in 1957.

Marilyn V. Longmuir looks at the historical background to the Burmese obsession with pristine bank notes.

Patrick Turnbull writes that the Battle of Dien Bien Phu, which opened on March 3rd, 1954, and continued until early May, marked the end not only of French, but of European hegemony in Asia.

Helen Bruce describes how, in Buddhist countries, for the last six hundred years, the albino elephant has always received special veneration.

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