Who's Who

Libya

Richard Hamilton on why the West has overstated the role of social media and understated the oral tradition in the Arab Spring.

Todd Thompson describes how the relationship between a Christian missionary, nicknamed ‘Anderson of Arabia’, and a Muslim religious leader from the Italian-controlled region of Cyrenaica played a major role in the creation of modern Libya after 1945.

A short video of King Idris greeting the cheering crowds in Tripoli as Libya is declared independent in 1951.

The Aeneid, Virgil’s epic Latin poem, offers as profound an insight into the current Libyan crisis as any 24-hour news channel, argues Robert Zaretsky.

During the seventh century the Arabs invaded North Africa three times, bringing not just a new religion but a language and customs that were alien to the native Berber tribes of the Sahara and Mediterranean hinterland. Eamonn Gearon looks at the rise of the first Islamic empire.

In the light of current events in North Africa and the Middle East, David Motadel examines the increasing frequency of popular rebellions around the world.

If the current Arab Revolutions are comparable to '79 or '89 moments, Gaddafi is looking increasingly like Ceaucescu, suggests Paul Lay.   

On the eve of the Second World War, the navies of Italy, France and Britain plotted for supremacy in the Mediterranean. Their actions resulted in the fracturing of the sea’s age-old unity, with consequences that persist to this day. Simon Ball explains how the ‘Middle Sea’ became the Middle East.

David Winter visits a land beset for millennia by the fantasies of outsiders.

Richard Cavendish explains how the Kingdom of Libya was established on December 24th, 1951.

Recent stories