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Greece

Territorial concessions in Anatolia were promised to the Greeks during the First World War but, writes Cyril Falls, hope of fulfilment was defeated by the resurgent republicans of Turkey.

Robert E. Zegger reflects on the the philhellenic crusade to free Greece in the 1820s.

John Godfrey describes how the capture of Constantinople in 1204 was an unexpected result of the Crusading movement.

Towards the end of the twelfth century, writes Jim Bradbury, Greek Fire, which the Byzantines had long used, was first employed in Western Europe.

Stephen Usher looks back at the life of a leading Athenian orator and Idealist during the city’s long war with Macedonia and its Greek allies.

Nicolas Cheetham describes how the Fourth Crusaders captured Byzantium in 1204 and French noblemen created feudal principalities in Southern Greece.

In ancient Cretan religious rites, the bull and the young athletes who engaged it played a mysterious but highly significant role, writes Richard Harrison.

Alan Haynes describes how, menaced by the Turks, the Emperor Manuel sought western help on his visits to Italy, France and England.

At a time when the Turkish rulers of Greece were conducting a profitable trade in ancient statues, Charles Fellows, an enlightened English tourist, rescued a precious hoard from Asia Minor. By Sarah Searight.

Alan Haynes describes how, for just over three centuries, Greek visitors often settled in England and associated with its clerics and learned men.

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