Volume 66 Issue 6 June 2016

The royal flight to Varennes took place on June 20th, 1791.

The songwriter was born on June 9th, 1891.

A Japanese map produced during the Second World War encouraged children to follow the Empire's military effort, explains Kate Wiles.

Henry VIII's coronation was greeted with a sense of hysterical optimism. As Lauren Johnson shows, it would not last.

Aristotle is so synonymous with learning that he has been known simply as ‘the Mind’, ‘the Reader’ and ‘the Philosopher’. Admired by both Darwin and Marx, Edith Hall explores his life and legacy.

We might applaud the tall, blond and ruggedly handsome Vikings of pop culture as being historically accurate, but authentic engagement with the past requires more than just convincing hair and make-up, says Oren Falk.

Although best known as Elizabeth I’s court magician, John Dee was also one of England’s most learned men. Katie Birkwood explores his books and the wealth of information they can provide on his early life.

Through the myth of the executioner’s mask, Alison Kinney explores our tortured relationship with life, death, mortality and museums.

For the tsarist regime, Siberia was a ‘vast prison without a roof’, where thousands of revolutionaries and political opponents were exiled. It became, as Daniel Beer explains, a laboratory of the Russian Revolution.

Two historians take opposing sides as Britain’s referendum on EU membership approaches. 

From the vantage point of today, the patronage of Alfonso X ‘El Sabio’ (‘the...

The movement and plight of people compelled to leave their own countries and to seek asylum overseas is ever present in our television broadcasts...

The forehead is the plainest part of the face. Compared with the eyes or the cheeks, there is little one can do...

Do the dead matter? This is the central question in this meticulously researched, all-encompassing exploration of our mortal remains. At its heart...

Tim Blanning offers a telling comparison at the beginning of this magisterial and insightful new biography. In 16th-century Brandenburg, the...

Professor Samons is no stranger to what he (but not all of us) call the ‘age of Pericles’, having edited a Cambridge Companion to that supposed...

Medieval hospitals used to be represented as hell holes: overcrowded reservoirs of infection lacking medical facilities; places in which to die,...