Volume 66 Issue 10 October 2016

A family planning clinic opened in New York on October 16th, 1916. It lasted only a few days.

Kate Wiles provides context for the first European image of the Aztec capital, razed by the Spanish in 1521.

Long before today’s project for a European political and economic union, William Penn, the English founder of Pennsylvania, offered a utopian vision of a Europe beyond the nation state, as Peter Schröder explains. 

In the popular imagination, William the Conqueror is, without doubt, the villain, yet the sources we have for his life are ambivalent. Marc Morris revisits the evidence to show the man behind the mythology: neither good nor bad, but complex and human.

Over the last 30 years, western ideas about the Ottoman Empire have been transformed, just as Turkish attitudes towards the West have become increasingly negative, writes Erik Zurcher.

Is reality simply a collection of unconnected moments and impressions? If so, what does it mean for our understanding of the past? For one Argentine writer, fiction was the perfect place to explore such questions, says Alexander Lee.

Two conquests of England in quick succession led to a period of shifting identities and allegiances. Courtnay Konshuh and Ryan Lavelle explore how those on the losing side of history tried to forge a place in a new world under new lords.

The survival of a recently discovered song by the early Greek poet is little short of a miracle, says David Gribble. How was it discovered and what does it add to our picture of a complex and elusive figure?

Contrary to the cliché, history is not only written by the victors. Katherine Weikert explains how those chronicling the 11th-century conquests in England and Scandinavia tried to rehabilitate the reputations of the vanquished.

The Islamic world produced some of the greatest minds of the Middle Ages, including a number of remarkable female scholars. Arezou Azad examines who these women were and why their place in history has been neglected.

Unpicking a tangle of history, myth and misunderstanding reveals why, for so long, we believed Harold was shot through the eye.

It is 300 years since the death of a remarkable Scottish noblewoman.

Since the beginning of the 20th century, a tiny collection of islets and shoals has been the focus of disputes involving seven nations.

Despite progress since the 1970s, female historians are still treated unfairly both inside and outside the academy. Things must change, says Suzannah Lipscomb.

Richard W. Bulliet brings a fresh view to a story that interests many: the invention of the wheel, providing new and interesting details about...

Aleppo, Syria’s second city after Damascus, is one of the oldest settlements on earth, where Abraham is supposed to have milked his flocks in the...

Frank Holt has form in the crowded field of Alexander studies. Good form, too: among the many virtues of his Into the Land of Bones (2005...

Mount Sinai holds a special place in the imagination as the place where Moses saw God and received the Tablets of the Law. Few who have visited it...

This pacy book is a whistle-stop tour of what the dust jacket calls our ‘dark history’, namely the ruthless pursuit of profit at the expense of...

Those familiar with the obsessive delights of genealogy will have realised that if you can trace your family in Britain back to 1400 you are...

Here is is a many-sided tale of Alexander the Great and of arsenic sulphide, of Bavarian limestone and of metaphorical black tigers, of...

Oxford is full of history, dating back to its settlement in Saxon times. Yet it is rarely associated with prehistory, especially the Neolithic...