Volume 65 Issue 8 August 2015

Joseph Lister's medical technique was first performed on August 12th, 1865.

William Kemmler was killed on August 6th, 1890. 

Many of the world’s languages derive from a single source. Harry Ritchie tells the story of Proto-Indo-European.

From luxury liners to troopships: Roland Quinault examines the close relationship between the Cunard line and Winston Churchill.

Roger Hudson details the tense situation leading up to the evacuation of British troops from Aden in 1967.

The glamorous success of Alcock and Brown’s first non-stop transatlantic flight in the wake of the Great War made the world smaller but no less nationalistic, argues Maurice Walsh.

Tim Stanley describes the Asama-Sansō Incident of 1972 and reveals the cyclical nature of political violence and the means of its defeat.

Paul Cartledge argues that all historiography can be seen as fictionalised and relishes the fact that novelists breathe new life into ancient worlds.

We tend to think of the early modern city as one beset by foul, dangerous air and dank odours. Yet it also inspired a golden age of perfumery, explains William Tullett. 

The momentous final days of the French revolutionary are well documented. Yet, argues Colin Jones, many of the established ‘facts’ are myths that do not stand up to scrutiny.

By no stretch of the imagination was Richard III a saint, but the furore that sprung up around his discovery and reburial was strongly reminiscent of a medieval cult of sainthood.

Britons like to think that they all pulled together during the Second World War, but as Clive Emsley shows, some of the work force, in particular those employed in the nation’s ports, were just as likely to be pulling a fast one.

Andrew Sharpe examines the contribution of Indian troops to one of the first major battles on the Western Front. 

A protest against the English Civil War ends in tragedy.

High-minded allegations of prurience should not stop historians from examining the intimate lives of people in the past.

Faced with a man in overalls flecked with white, saying 'I am a painter', we know we are talking to a painter and decorator. Faced with a book...

This volume is a sumptuous art history performance, with as many images as there are pages of text. This shows Caroline, the wife of George II, in...

One of the few occasions on which an early modern ruler interacted with his subjects was during a ceremonial entry into one of the cities in his...

Edith Hall has written a flamboyant, readable and different account of the ancient Greeks, well tailored for the modern reader. She tells the old...

Archive fever among scholars is a poetic if dangerous phenomenon: time spent hunched over disintegrating manuscripts breathing in the occasionally...

The world might be forgiven for rolling its eyes at the prospect of another book on Shakespeare. Does Shakespeare in London, the latest...

John Ruskin anathematised the painter J.M.W. Turner as having ‘lived in imagination in ancient Carthage, lived practically in modern Margate …...

There was long a complaint among military historians, one best voiced by Brian Bond, that there was a major disjuncture between their work,...

The Greeks had their gods and the modern world has the Greeks. Something about them ensured that their political, artistic and philosophical ideas...