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Roger Hudson gives context to a photograph highlighting the plight of Galician Jews after the Russian army's invasion in the Great War.

Olivia Williams takes issue with some of the wilder assertions and anachronisms contained in Thomas Maples’ otherwise engaging 1991 article on the 18th-century gin craze.

Thomas Penn and his colleagues have embarked on a project to publish a series of short biographies of England’s and, subsequently, Britain’s monarchs. Why is the study of kings and queens still relevant in our less than deferential age?

As the Ebola outbreak in West Africa continues its dreadful march, Duncan McLean looks at the 600-year-old practice of isolating individuals and communities in order to bring an end to epidemics and assesses the effectiveness of such measures.

Vladimir Putin is by no means the first Russian leader to threaten his neighbours with force and annexations. Two centuries ago European statesmen faced a similar predicament. Only then it was Poland at stake, not Ukraine, as Mark Jarrett explains.

The crisis in Ukraine has revealed to the world the divisions that exist throughout Europe about how the Second World War is remembered. Gareth Pritchard and Desislava Gancheva look at the controversial debate around wartime collaboration.

Do war toys encourage violent behaviour and make conflict more acceptable? Or do they offer genuine insight into military history? Philip Kirby, Sean Carter and Tara Woodyer examine the evidence.

The young men who surrounded Henry III of France have been dismissed by some historians as effeminate, inconsequential sycophants. Robert Knecht offers a very different account of their activities and influence.

Richard Dale investigates the mysterious death of Richard Hunne in Lollards Tower at Old St Paul’s, one of the most notorious episodes of the English Reformation.

A BBC drama from 1974 highlights the tensions in writing feminist history.

Charles Freeman discusses his research into one of history's greatest mysteries.

Historians and literary scholars should be encouraged to share their insights in order to paint a more complete picture of the past, argues Mathew Lyons.

Antoine-Joseph Sax was born on November 6th, 1814.

Faisal al Saud became ruler on November 2nd, 1964

'Philip the Fair' died at his palace at Fontainebleau on November 29th, 1314.

Helen Castor asks if a medical diagnosis for Joan of Arc’s ‘visions’, first proposed in History Today in 1958, neglects the role of religion, all pervasive in the enchanted world of the Middle Ages.

Mira Bar-Hillel recalls the family friend who was once one of the controllers of the Zionist organisation responsible for the assassination of Britain’s minister resident in the Middle East.

Jerome de Groot rounds up recent releases.

Daniel Snowman asks whether historical biography can be considered a serious contribution to history and assesses the latest trends in the field.


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