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Volume: 61 Issue: 11

Contents of History Today, November 2011

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The leading Victorian radical and Liberal politician John Bright was born on November 16th 1811.

Few figures in British political history have endured such lingering hostility as the statesman who did so much to forge Europe’s post-Napoleonic settlement, says...

Clovis I died in Paris on November 27th 511, aged 46.

Anne Sebba revisits Michael Bloch’s article, first published in History Today in 1979, on the historian Philip Guedalla’s enthusiastic but misguided...

To mark the 400th anniversary of his birth, UNESCO has declared Evliya Çelebi a ‘man of the year’. His Seyahatname, or Book of Travels, is one of the...

Gated communities may be growing in number but they are nothing new, as Michael Nelson knows from personal experience.

Tim Grady on postwar Germany’s attempts to remember the contribution made by its Jewish combatants in the First World War.

A class confrontation at the Epsom Derby of 1920.

A selection of readers' correspondence with the editor, Paul Lay.

Colin Jones and Emily Richardson reveal a little-known collection of obscene and irreverent 18th-century drawings targetting Madame de Pompadour, the favourite...

Taylor Downing tells the story of the Central Interpretation Unit at Medmenham, Buckinghamshire, where the RAF’s aerial photo interpreters played a critical role...

Anthony Fletcher pays tribute to the great historian of English protestantism, who ventured far and wide in the academic world.

Inspired by the discovery of the frozen bodies of three soldiers of the First World War, Peter Englund considers the ways we remember and write about a conflict...

Visitors to the fashionable spa town of Cheltenham 'take the waters'.

At its height, the British Empire was the largest the world has ever known. Its history is central to Britain’s history, yet, as Zoë Laidlaw shows, this imperial...

In recent years British models have reappeared on the catwalk wearing real fur, though it is unlikely to ever regain the mass appeal it once had. Carol Dyhouse...

The academic training that historians undergo qualifies them to speak out on issues beyond their remit, argues Tim Stanley.

Enter our crossword and win an audiobook of Alastair Cooke's America

The first performance of The Tempest on record was at court on All Hallows’ Day, on November 1st 1611.

A political exile, Richard Wagner found safety in Zurich, where he also discovered the love and philosophy that inspired his greatest works, as Paul Doolan...

Michael Bentley looks at the father of British historiography who was an eloquent and controversial opponent of teleology.

Big protests on the streets of London aren't a new thing...

Jeremy Black reviews Charles H. Parker's account of trade, migration, disease and religion in the early modern age.

Bernard Porter reviews Benjamin Grob-Fitzgibbon's account of the violence that accompanied Britain's decolonisation after the Second World War.

Edith Hall reviews David Mattingly's study of Roman imperialism.

Paul Lay talks to the author of Jerusalem: The Biography, the History Today Book Club title for November. The two will be in conversation at the...

Denis Judd on an entertaining and frequently revealing new biography of Chamberlain.

Roland Quinault reviews Peter Marsh's account of the Chamberlain family.

Martin Evans looks at a new book that covers the heyday of the French Foreign Legion.

The Great War and the Making of the Modern World and With Our Backs To The Wall : two books on the First World War which 'will be tough acts to...

This month's quiz includes questions on the Iron Curtain, the Spanish Civil War, and pirates in the Caribbean


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