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Volume: 57 Issue: 11

Contents of History Today, November 2007

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Though it pains me a little to admit it, I strongly suspect that more people learn their history from television than from magazines, books or even schools.

The artist Angelica Kauffman died on November 5th, 1807, aged sixty-six.

Kevin Desmond looks for records of a little-known French inventor who rivalled Thomas Edison.

Martin Bell, famous for his BBC reports from the war in Bosnia in the 1990s, celebrates the life and work of the man whom modern war reporters admire the most, The...

Continuing his series on how cartoonists have seen events great and small, Mark Bryant looks at the coverage of one of ‘Victoria’s little wars’.

Julie Kerr looks at the role of hospitality to the Benedictine community between the years 1066 to 1250, and how monks and nuns sought to fulfil their monastic...

Hitler’s armed forces included many thousands of men of Jewish origin. How did this come about, and what were their military experiences like? Josie Dunn and Roger...

The artist of the Enlightenment had a little known stay in Liverpool which helped shape his art, and this is the focus of a new exhibition at the Walker Art Gallery...

Archaeology continues to be an irresistible lure to publishers, broadcasters and the...

Author and journalist Jonathan Fenby explains what started him on an endless journey of exploration into China’s past.

In the latest of our articles on climate change and the study of history, Mark Levene makes an impassioned plea for historians to leave the comfort zone and spell...

John Shepherd says it’s time to reappraise the political reputation of Ramsay MacDonald.

Suzanne Bardgett, director of the Holocaust Exhibition at London’s Imperial War Museum, describes the setting up of the Srebrenica Memorial Room at the scene where...

Simon Maghakyan describes the destruction of a vital part of the heritage and early history of Armenians.

The Spanish government managed by the Duke of Lerma was forced to declare a moratorium on its debts on November 19th, 1607.

The Duke of Orleans was assassinated on November 23rd, 1407.

Pilgrimages were among the earliest forms of historical travelling, and they remain popular in many parts of the world. Alex Koller tries Japan’s most famous Buddhist...

Martin Kemp explores the complex and ambiguous relationships between humans and animals in their depictions by artists, and investigates the ways in which animal...

The young Pharaoh has gripped peoples’ imagination and changed lives. Desmond Zwar looks at the career of the man who claimed to have spent seven years living in...

Archaeology continues to be an irresistible lure to publishers, broadcasters and the general public. The 1990s saw an extraordinary number of spectacular finds...


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