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2006

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Anthony Fletcher uses the papers of his artistic great-aunt, who, as a young nationalist, wrote an eyewitness account of the Easter Rising, to explore her youthful...

Alysa Levene explores the ideas of William Cadogan whose enlightened ideas on raising healthy and happy babies in the mid-18th century pre-dated those of Rousseau...

Charles Townshend has read hundreds of 'witness statements' from the men and women who took part in the Easter Rising, made available to the public in 2003 after...

York Membery sings the praises of the great wartime leader on the ninetieth anniversary of his coming to power.

The first result of the Liberal Party landslide was reported on January 12th, 1906, with a Liberal victory in Ipswich.

David Wurtzel has been reading the diary of Lester Ziffren, the United Press correspondent in Madrid who, seventy years ago this month, witnessed the start of the...

Jerome Kuehl samples an account of a dinner party in 1922, attended by the giants of Modernism, including Picasso, Joyce and Proust.

David Anderson, Huw Bennett and Daniel Branch believe that the Freedom of Information Act is being used to protect the perpetrators of a war crime that took place...

Eamon Duffy tells how a careful study of surviving medieval Books of Hours can tell us much about the spiritual and temporal life of their owners and much more...

The US Supreme Court looks likely to overturn the Federal law on abortion. Nicholas Hill and Peter Ling look at the political background to the legal argument....

Adlai Stevenson ran for a second time against Eisenhower in 1956, but Eisenhower won the election even more convincingly than in 1952.

Keith Robbins looks at this new title on pacifism.

Segregation on buses in Alabama officially ended on November 13th, 1956.

Guy de la Bédoyère looks at the first of Penguin's History of Britain series on the history and archaeology left by the Romans.

Robin Waterfield, author of a new book on the Greek soldier Xenophon, explains how he came to retrace the steps of the soldier’s famous journey to the Black Sea.

Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of the deportation of an important figure in Greek Cypriot nationalist history, on March 9th, 1956.

Jonathan Conlin asks what the National Gallery has meant to the cultural and civic life of Britain since its foundation in 1824.

Review by Peter Ling

Jacob Middleton investigates the eccentric set of prejudices against shaving that led our Victorian forefathers to adorn their chins with a lush growth of facial...

Richard Dimbleby’s account of what he witnessed at Bergen-Belsen in April 1945 – ‘the most horrible day of my life’ – has acquired an iconic status in British...

Westminster Abbey, England’s necropolis for royalty and other notables, reveals more secrets.

Mark Rathbone assesses the degree of success achieved by one of the great Victorian Prime Ministers.

Neil Taylor suggests that the starting point from which to explore the full and varied history of Berlin is the apparently empty space at its centre.

Charlotte Crow steps inside the V&A Museum of Childhood in London’s East End, where the second phase of a £4.7 million development has just reached completion.

Richard Vinen ponders the political significance of two of France’s most potent female icons and finds there is more to them than meets the eye.

The astronomer was born on November 8th 1656.

The great Victorian engineer was born on 9th April, 1806.

September 21st, 1756

The British Labour Party's first parliamentary leader was born on August 15th, 1856.

December 18th, 1856

Fransjohan Pretorius explains why the Boer War of 1899-1902 was a period of sustained and spontaneous creation of folk art, one of the most productive and creative...

Mark Bevir examines a title on the Soviets and British Labour

Ian Thatcher appreciates a magnum opus from Richard Overy and Jan Bolton assesses a new Tudor biography.

Robert Pearce has enjoyed two books on 20th-century British history, but has not been able to resist pointing out errors, whilst Michael Lynch has been impressed...

John Plowright has been reading a volume in the new-look Access to History series; Julius Ruiz has enjoyed a volume commemorating the beginning of one of the most...

Charlotte Crow reports a recent debate between historians and programme makers on the state of history on the small screen, and a television success in that field....

Graham Goodlad assesses the success of British governments in responding to the demands of war, from the French Revolutionary conflict to the 1914-18 struggle....

Nicholas Orme examines the new book on medieval archaeology from Time Team’s Francis Pryor.

Graham Goodlad examines the management of public opinion by British governments between the French Revolutionary conflict and the Great War.

Kevin Halloran puts forward a new suggestion for the location of one of the most disputed questions of Anglo-Saxon history: the site of Athelstan’s great battle...

Richard Cavendish describes how Caliph Uthman was murdered on June 16th, 656.

Peter Furtado introduces the remarkable work of Norma Percy.

Juliet Gardiner reviews the current exhibition at Tate Liverpool that celebrates the British flair for documentary film-making.

Peter Barber, Head of Map Collections at the British Library, finds his way round ‘London: A Life in Maps’ a new exhibition opening at the British Library on November...

Jeremy Black recommends a guide for the armchair military historian.

York Membery recalls one of the great statesmen of late Victorian and Edwardian Britain, whose career ended with a devastating stroke a hundred years ago this month...

Having already resigned the sovereignty of the Netherlands in 1555, Charles V resigned Spain on January 16th, 1556.

Alison Barnes has unearthed a transcription of the Privy Purse Accounts of Charles II that fills the gap for 1666, for which year the originals are now lost. They...

Civilians have always suffered in warfare, and Early Modern Europe was no exception. But they contributed to war as well, through their taxes, their victuals and...

October 7th, 1956

Cultural historian Lucy Hughes-Hallett considers how perceptions of Cleopatra have moved in the last decade and a half.

Film historian Thomas Doherty does some detective work on a mystery from the 1930s, when the Hollywood studios had to deal with the upsurge of racism in Hitler’s...

Michael Simmons has been back to Budapest as it prepares to commemorate the anniversary of the 1956 Uprising, and finds many questions still unanswered.

Kendrick Oliver revisits the scene of a massacre that became a watershed in public perceptions of the Vietnam war.

Gary Baines explains that the ANC government has institutionalized memories of the Soweto uprising in its efforts to build a new national identity in South Africa.

A book review by June Purvis.

R. E. Foster surveys the changing interpretations and introduces the key facts.

1,700 years ago this month, York saw the proclamation of a man who changed the course of the history of the world. Christopher Kelly introduces the Emperor...

Maxine Berg reviews a title on shopping, collecting and patronage in Jacobean, Stuart and Civil War England.

R. E. Foster reconsiders the origins of the Church Settlement of 1559.

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant looks at the career of Victor Weisz (Vicky), for whom the Hungarian Uprising and its repression by Soviet tanks proved a political...

Richard Cavendish marks the foundnig of a famous Victorian penitentiary, on March 20th, 1806.

Kevin Haddick Flynn looks back at the life and times of radical Michael Davitt as Ireland remembers the centenary of his death on May 31st.

Brian Girvin explains the tensions between the Irish government and many of the Irish people in their attitudes to the war against Nazism.

Ben Reiss looks at the background to Manet’s extraordinary series of paintings of the demise of a Mexican emperor, now on display at MOMA, New York, and described in...

The man credited with discovering the Americas died aged 55 on May 20th, 1506

The founder of the Society of Jesus died on July 31st, 1556.

October 22nd, 1806

Krista Kesselring describes how coroners in the Early Modern period tried to establish the cause of death in disputed cases.

William Kuhn considers some of the ways a look at Benjamin Disraeli’s sexuality challenges our idea of the Victorians and the man himself.

Brian Winston looks back at some of the ways in which history has been presented on the screen, and sees the documentary based on archival footage as intrinsic to...

Editor Peter Furtado explains our current series on cartoons and its relevance today.

Long before Jamie Oliver’s crusade, the provision of food in schools aroused passionate debate. John Burnett remembers one hundred years of school meals in Britain...

Rob Johnston advises that we adopt a questioning approach.

For some time now, ‘2007’ has been short-hand in some quarters for the bicentenary of the Act for the Abolition of the Slave Trade in 1807, an anniversary that is...

Tristram Hunt looks at the development of conservation and environment movements in the twentieth century, and particularly at the achievements of the Campaign to...

In March 1966, a few months before the England football team won the World Cup, the Football Association lost the trophy. Martin Atherton tells the full, often...

Barry Coward samples two titles on the English Revolution and Cromwell.

Ludmilla Jordanova looks at the ways in which scientists presented themselves and their activities to the public through art, and considers how this reflects on the...

Marisa Linton examines a work on one of the main characters in the French Revolution.

Fidel Castro's first, unsuccessful attempt at overthrowing the Cuban regime began on December 2nd, 1956.

Lynn McDonald describes the lasting impact of Florence Nightingale on improving public health for the poor.

The Second World War formally ended on May 8th, 1945. Here, Adam Tooze examines the events in Germany that ignited the Second World War. Did Hitler intend to...

Martin Evans looks at the events of 1956 and the French war on terror, both at home and elsewhere, and how this was a turning point for French fortunes in the...

Gareth Jenkins looks for continuities in American foreign policy from the 1960s to the 2000s.

Paul Dukes examines two tales of Russian emigres.

Anna Isab’s study of Gladstone and his attitudes to women is reviewed by Trevor Fisher.

Mike Huggins revisits the early years of British greyhound racing, the smart modern sports craze of interwar Britain.

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant looks at two humorous takes on the same subject – the Siegfried Line, as the German defensive Westwall was known by the Allies, by...

Stella Tillyard explains how she came to write multiple biographies of 18th-century families, most recently that of George III whose brothers and sisters were...

Ian Cawood charts the changing reputation of a key figure in the postwar Labour Party.

Andrew Cook looks at the mysterious career of a man notorious for selling seats in the House of Lords.

Debbi Codling looks at the beliefs and spiritual life of the man who usurped Richard II, an anointed king.

Gervase Phillips explains how and why Henry so badly mishandled his relations with the Scots.

Philip Mould is an art dealer, author and broadcaster specializing in the discovery of lost antique portraiture. This month he opens a major gallery in Dover Street,...

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant explores the art of Carlo Pellegrini,  aka ‘Ape’, whose cartoons of politicians and society figures for Vanity Fair help define the way...

David Bates asks what professional historians can do to satisfy the popular craving for history.

Editor Peter Furtado explains current trials setting historical precedents.

English Heritage celebrates 100 years of aerial photography.

Taylor Downing considers this new analysis of the way history is presented on film and television.

Craig Thompson, Executive Producer, World Congress of History Producers announces this year’s Congress produced in association with History Today.

Did Hitler intend to provoke a general war over Poland in September 1939 or was it a serious miscalculation? Adam Tooze examines the views of leading historians...

Peter Furtado welcomes a major exhibition of the great painter of Henry VIII and his court at Tate Britain.

Mark Bryant describes how the Daily Mail nearly became the first national daily in Britain to feature large political cartoons on its front page, fifteen...

A recent government initiative suggests Britain is failing in its policies towards children in care. Jad Adams explains how similar concerns a hundred years ago lay...

Michael Hunter, an authority on the natural philosopher Robert Hooke, describes his excitement at the recent discovery of an unknown manuscript in Hooke’s hand. He...

Chris Smallbone explains the effect of United States expansion on the native Americans of the Great Plains in the mid-19th century.

Alan Farmer examines the process which led to the unification of Italy.

Gabriel Ronay remembers the dramatic days of October 1956 when, as a student in Budapest, he was at the heart of the protests against the Soviet occupation.

We are all invited to select seven new wonders of the world. Mary Beard investigates the list of candidates and reflects on what makes a monument a myth.

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant looks at the work of the man who invented the art of political cartooning, and asks what effect his drawings had on one of their...

John Spiller examines interpretations of the role of Parliament in the reign of the first Stuart king.

Max Adams looks at the works of the artist John Martin, his radical schemes to improve Victorian London, and his broad circle of friends at the forefront of political...

Fifty years after Khrushchev’s famous denunciation of Stalin at the 20th Congress of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union, John Etty examines what was at stake...

David Loades looks at the man who was king of England in his youth, and her bitter enemy thirty years later.

Sebastian Wormell introduces the Polish city that survived the worst of the Second World War.

Peter Furtado reviews a complex documentary on the 21st-century Austrians who live in a town formerly home to a Nazi concentration camp.

Pat Wagstaff looks at the history of a famous jewel that is reputed to have an association with Mary I, and is now in the possession of Elizabeth Taylor.

Martin Evans reads a publication on a social history of 20th-century Gallic society.

Brian James revisits Ypres, where new ways of commemorating the events of the First World War are enthralling visitors of all generations.

Susan-Mary Grant argues that the cult of the fallen soldier has its origins at Gettysburg and other battlefield monuments of the American Civil War.

The Mauretania was launched on September 20th, 1906.

While Hezbollah again hit the headlines during the summer, its historical roots are less familiar. Andrew Arsan traces the political emergence of the Shi’a...

Russell Tarr explains how the Bolsheviks established their grip on Russia after the 1917 Revolution, and at what cost.

Correspondence with the editor.

Thoughts from our readers on previous articles in History Today.

Comments from our readers on History Today articles

Brigid Wells introduces extracts from the memoirs of her mother, Susan Richmond, who as a young English actress postponed a promising career on the stage to offer her...

Peter Furtado explores a treat of an English parish history

Marilyn Monroe married Arthur Miller on June 29th, 1956. The marriage lasted five years.

Susan Haskins suggests that the authors of The Holy Blood and the Holy Grail and Dan Brown, who famously faced each in court earlier this year, are guilty of the same...

Account of the Navy is awarded British Academy’s annual prize.

Mark Bevir explores two works on the impact and transcendence of 19th-century Whig history.

On May 21st, Montenegrins are being asked, in a long-delayed referendum, if they want to end their union with Serbia. James Evans explains the background to their...

Tobias Grey uncovers interesting work in France that brings the latest forensic technology to the aid of historical mysteries.

The Theosophists Helena Blavatsky, Annie Besant, Margaret Cousins and others went to India at the end of the 19th century to search for God and universal...

Paul Ward gives guidance to students on making a key transition.

Jane Bowden-Dan explores medical links between the Caribbean and London that throw important light on the position of blacks in eighteenth-century British society.

Ruth Boreham outlines the history of the famous publishing dynasty whose archive has been preserved for the nation and is now accessible to all at the National...

Bernard Porter argues that history and patriotism should be kept firmly apart.

Michael Broers argues that the influence of Napoleon’s Empire was out of all proportion to its duration.

Philip Mansel recalls the creation of the kingdom of Belgium in 1831, in a successful act of co-operation between London, Paris and Brussels.

Helen Strudwick, Curator of the Egyptian galleries at the Fitzwilliam Museum, Cambridge, explains the new refurbishment at the museum and the opportunities it has...

Vincent Barnett reveals that there is more to Machiavelli than his notorious reputation.

Tom Neuhaus looks at the subversive young Germans known as Swing Youth who refused to have their hobbies and tastes dictated to them by the Nazis and provoked...

David Culbert looks at the development of radio news commentary in the United States in the late 1930s and the political climate that shaped it.

The controversial decision to uncover the remains of the famous 18th-century castrato Farinelli in Bologna may or may not prove insightful for music historians...

Rhiannon Looseley uncovers the forgotten history of the evacuation of over 100,000 French soldiers from Dunkirk to Britain in May 1940, and describes what happened...

Sheila Corr, History Today picture editor, explains how pictures, properly archived and used, can add to our knowledge of the past.

As Battle of Britain Day approaches Brian James has been finding out why some of today’s leading military historians argue that it was not the RAF but the Royal...

George Bernard Shaw influenced the Abdication Crisis with a short play that has been forgotten in the last seventy years. Stanley Weintraub remembers it, and we...

Michael Fulford reviews a new approach to the first-century city in Italy.

F.G. Stapleton seeks to understand why the Pontiff of 1939-58 has been called ‘Hitler’s Pope’.

The enigmatic subject of a fine portrait by John Singer Sargent, Dr Samuel-Jean Pozzi dazzled the women of Paris in the late 19th century, including Sarah Bernhardt,...

Graham Gendall Norton introduces a city that has faced invasions and foreign adventures since Roman times.

The premiere of Beethoven’s Violin Concerto at the Vienna opera house on December 23rd, 1806, was not a success.

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant looks at the work of one artist who took on the power of Tammany Hall and won – and his protégé whose enemies resorted to drawing up...

Julian Jackson reviews the Book of the Year for 2005 on homosexuality in the capital.

Long before the appearance of green, brown and black bins on our doorsteps we recycled our household rubbish. Tim Cooper investigates the history of waste recovery....

It is rumoured that George W. Bush’s preferred reading recently has been Andrew Roberts’ updating for the twentieth century of Winston Churchill’s History of the...

Linda Kaye describes a project to make accessible to the public the history of a series of ‘cinemagazines’ made by the Government in the 1950s and 60s to promote...

A review of the latest book on how war is remembered from Jay Winter.

The coincidence, or otherwise, of memory and history has been a fruitful field for study for several years now, and one that has proved to be fraught with controversy...

Marisa Linton reviews the life and career of one of the most vilified men in history.

Charlie Cottrell previews the result of an international collaboration that brings the works of Rodin to the Royal Academy.

Anthony Grafton remembers Theodor Mommsen, the great German historian of the Roman republic and literary giant of his day.

Discovered during the French occupation but seized by the victorious British after six months of desert battle, the Rosetta Stone symbolized the struggle for...

Romans have reacted passionately to the new presentation of one of the Eternal City’s key historic monuments, Charlotte Crow explains.

Viv Sanders puts an inspiring figure, and an important event, into historical perspective.

Geoffrey Hosking looks at the place of Russia within the Soviet Union, a position fraught with paradoxes that still resonate today.

Mike Wells argues that Russian decisions in July 1870 were of major significance for the history of Europe.

Chandak Sengoopta looks at how the discovery of hormones, the body’s chemical messengers, revolutionized ideas of human nature and human potential in the twentieth...

Sylvia Ellis has been listening in to LBJ’s taped telephone calls from the Oval Office and finds they have much to tell the historian about the man behind the...

Art historian and museologist Julian Spalding finds nothing to beat looking carefully at historic objects in their original surroundings.

Rana Mitter reviews this volume on the negotions between Mao and Nixon.

Leanda de Lisle explores biographies of two heavyweight Elizabethan playwrights.

Patricia Pierce finds out about the two men responsible for publishing Shakespeare’s First Folio.

Roger Tolson introduces a new exhibition of Commonwealth war artists at the Imperial War Museum, London.

Carmen Callil talks to Martin Evans about her recent excursion into the lies and hypocrisy of Vichy France.

Graham Noble introduces a figure whose career sheds light on the power struggles of Henry VIII’s reign.

Jeremy Black samples a publication on the history of classical militarism.

Frederic Raphael explains how the isles of Greece, and the rest of the classical world, caught his imagination.

Jeremy Black reads an account of British intelligence in India.

Simon Kitson explores the prevalence of spying for and against the Nazis in southern France after the German invasion.

The Soviet leader gave his famous speech on 'The Personality Cult and its Consequences' in a closed session on February 25th, 1956.

Barry Turner, editor of the Statesman’s Year Book, describes how this venerable reference book came into being.

Charles Stephenson introduces a plan for chemical warfare in the Napoleonic navy, devised by Thomas Cochrane, Lord Dundonald, the model for Patrick O’Brien’s Jack...

Timothy Benson, whose new book explores how the Suez Crisis was viewed in the world’s press and by cartoonists in particular, here tells the story of a tumultuous...

Steve Morewood looks at the the rise and fall of British dominance of the Suez Canal in the years 1882 to 1954.

Sylvia Pankhurst was taken to the women's gaol at Holloway on October 24th, 1906.

Paul Wilkinson unearths a Roman bath house with possible religious uses in Kent.

Archaeologists in Italy are uncovering fascinating evidence about the origins of Italy’s medieval hilltop villages to create a new and compelling picture of the...

Stella Tillyard explores a publication on diplomats from ancient times to the modern era

A new volume on the role of animals during war time is reviewed by Jonathan Burt.

Monarchs claim to be surrounded by an aura of majesty. Cartoon historian Mark Bryant examines some famous incidents when a caricaturist’s pen punctured this aura...

Gerald Howson looks at two titles on the Spanish Civil War.

The Battle Creek Toasted Corn Flake Company, later to be known as Kellog's, was founded on February 19th, 1906.

Joannes Chrisostomus Wolfgang Gottlieb Mozart was born in Salzburg on January 27th, 1756.

Richard Cavendish describes how British prisoners were held captive by the army of the Nawab of Bengal, for one night, in the 'black hole' of Fort William in...

James Barker considers the role of terrorism in the establishment of Israel, on the 60th anniversary of the attack on the British military headquarters in Jerusalem...

Charles Freeman visits a city that has been defined by its waterways – and above all, by its bridge.

Patricia Cleveland-Peck introduces a beautiful string of Spanish religious foundations.

Marius Ostrowski explains why the Church was so dominant in the Middle ages, but also sees traces of a growing secularism.

Jerome Kuehl explores a work on the post-war clash of societies

Richard Cust introduces a new website with details of a wide-ranging court of Charles I’s reign.

Christopher Tyerman, author of a new history of the crusading movement, explains why he believes the crusades were important in shaping the ideology and fiscal and...

Daniel Snowman analyses this weighty volume on the development of European culture.

Richard Cavendish marks the demise of an important Renaissance figure, on March 20th, 1656.

Richard Cavendish examines the career of all-round sportsman Charles Burgess Fry who died September 7th, 1956.

Peter Neville says that Bush and Blair failed to draw the proper lessons from Munich 1938 when they raised the spectre of Chamberlain and appeasement to justify...

Deirdre McCloskey describes how Europe after 1600 half escaped the ancient condemnation of economic life.

The Holy Roman Empire had survived over a thousand years, when it was finally destroyed by Napoleon and the French in 1806.

Jonathan Colman provides an overview of modern British Imperial History, introducing the key events and issues that students need to understand.

Graham Noble examines the origins and traces the consequences of the notorious Edict of 1492.

Michael Hunter on a book exploring the Newtonian Revolution

Geza Vermes looks at the Christmas stories in the Bible with a historian’s eye.

Alison Barnes sets the record straight on who was really responsible for introducing this popular custom to Britain.

The first US airdrop of a thermonuclear bomb happened on May 20th, 1956.

Richard Cavendish marks the anniversary of King James I's creation and proclamation of a union flag, on April 12th, 1606.

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant explores the visual satire emanating from both sides of the conflict between Russia and Japan in the first decade of the 20th century....

Historical travel, alone or in organized tours, is burgeoning and fun. Our new series suggests some places for the past-minded traveller to think about. ...

Martin Pugh revisits one of the most bitter disputes in history and assesses its impact on industrial relations and the wider political landscape of the...

Hugh Purcell finds stirring memories of the British Raj in this thriving city, a far cry from its dreadful reputation of a generation ago.

Graham Gendall Norton reviews William St Clair’s volume on the day to day workings of the slave trade at Cape Coast Castle.

Jeremy Black reviews this major new work by Christopher Clark on Prussia, ‘The Iron Kingdom’.

Few works of art are as closely linked to history as the gold salt cellar commissioned by Francis I of France in 1541 from the Florentine goldsmith and sculptor,...

Charlotte Crow visits the newly restored Kew Palace, country house to George III and his family from 1800-18 and a royal residence for ninety years.

By George Bernard Shaw. First published December 5th, 1936, in the Evening Standard.

Joanna Laynesmith examines claims that Edward IV was a bastard and tells the dramatic story of his mother, Cecily Neville, Duchess of York.

Forget Tony Blair or Margaret Thatcher, says Klaus Larres; Winston Churchill was the supreme prevaricator when it came to giving up power.

Mary Harlow delves into a title on the elderly and history.

James Waterson introduces the slave warriors of medieval Islam who overthrew their masters, defeated the Mongols and the Crusaders and established a dynasty that...

Richard Wilkinson, Louis XIV’s new biographer, searches for the real Sun King.

Martin Evans talks to historian, biographer and novelist Peter Ackroyd.

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant looks at the career of the Dutch cartoonist whose searing indictment of German atrocities in the First World War won him plaudits from...

Cartoon historian Mark Bryant looks at the early work of Carl Giles for left-wing publications and traces the origins of his cartoon family.

The Hungarian city successfully repelled Sultan Mehmet II's army on July 22nd, 1456.

The Agadir Crisis of 1911 was one of a number of incidents that raised international tensions in the years before 1914. Nigel Falls describes the European powers’...

David Lowenthal argues that in recent years there has been a retreat from engagement with many aspects of the past. He suggests that, in turn, this points to an...

Richard Ballard looks at how events in the opening years of the French Revolution took shape in a town three days’ journey from Paris.

Richard Cavendish describes the massacre of the 'slave hounds' at the settlement of Pottawatomie Creek on May 24th, 1856.

Alex Sanmark tells the strange tale of the ill-fated marriage of Philip Augustus of France and his Danish princess at the end of the twelfth century.

The Prussians invaded Saxony on August 29th, 1756, marking the beginning of the Seven Years War of 1756-63.

Miri Rubin reviews a book on the Renaissance.

Hugh Purcell finds answers to how 19th-century India was administrated in this book.

Derek Wilson samples two works on the arts in Stuart England.

Richard Cavendish describes the earthquake that shook San Francisco on April 18th, 1906.

James Exelby unearths the activities of a forgotten British spy whose documents and memoir provide a fascinating insight into the circumstances surrounding the...

Jonathan Marwil reviews a title on the 1848 bid for independence from Austria

Peter Furtado introduces one of the most traumatic places in British military history.

Bernhard Rieger looks at a lavish book on planes from after the First World War to the 1950s.

Editor Peter Furtado explores the themes of this issue of the magazine.

As  the 150th anniversary of the Victoria Cross is celebrated, Richard Vinen looks beyond the individual acts of heroism that have merited the honour, to the wider...

The Historical Association is celebrating its hundredth birthday. Keith Robbins appraises its past and present role in acting as the voice for ‘History’.

Nicholas Stargardt explores Adam Tooze's masterpiece on re-writing the history of the Nazis and Second World War.

Wilfrid Prest reviews a title on the politics of the 18th and 19th centuries

Andrew Robinson marvels at the brain power and breadth of knowledge of the 18th-century polymath Thomas Young. He examines his relationship with his contemporaries,...

Susie Green finds in the fate of the last truly wild community of Bengal tigers a metaphor for humanity’s treatment of the planet.

Kevin Jefferys examines a publication of seminal influence on the postwar Labour party.

Margaret Walsh tracks down an attempt to link the appeal of the greyhound with the brand values of a famous American company.

Graham Gendall Norton takes us on a magical mystery tour of the world of historical tourism.

Peter Furtado reports on the awards for 2005 given by History Today.

In recent years Hallowe’en has become a major popular festival, with children everywhere dressed as ghosts, devils and witches.

Richard Cavendish remembers the events of November 2nd, 1906.

The artist, scientist, botanist, anatomist, engineer, inventor and all-round genius Leonardo da Vinci (1452-1519) used paper in a unique way.

Tim Clancey asks whether American Presidents have exceeded their legitimate powers.

Russel Tarr shows that there is much more to using video than pressing ‘play’.

Once again Russel Tarr demonstrates how ICT can enrich and enliven the work of historians.

The history of our times has witnessed violence on an unimaginable scale. George Kassimeris reflects on the age-old horrors of warfare and struggles to find reasons...

Pat Thane examines a publication on Britain in the 20th century and the military-industrial complex.

The beliefs of the man who painted some of the most famous Christian images are shrouded in mystery. Alex Keller coaxes Leonardo da Vinci’s thoughts out of some...

Gervase Phillips points out the limitations in a common interpretation.

Kate Berridge’s history of Madame Tussaud is analysed by another biographer of the wax modeller, Pamela Pilbeam.

Juliet Gardiner reviews a title on how society was mobilised and morale maintained through the 1930s and World War.

Nicholas Orme returns to the classroom to find out how boys, and girls, were educated  from the Anglo-Saxons to the Tudors; and finds that the foundations of our...

Deborah Hayter argues why family and local history archives should be prevented from being sold abroad and, whenever possible, remain accessible in the region...

Nick Barratt, presenter of television programmes that take people back to the archives, explains how he found his own way into the dusty vaults.

As part of the ongoing debate over Black History Month, Tristram Hunt asks for greater dialogue between politicians and academics concerning the place of history in...

Henry VIII may be our most famous monarch, a man who still bestrides English history as mightily as he dominated his kingdom nearly 500 years ago – but how well do...

Wilfrid Prest unravels myths perpetrated by historians about the great 18th-century lawyer.

History Today honours its oldest and most distinguished friend, adviser to every editor since 1951.

Peter Furtado previews a major exhibition opening in York at the end of the month.

Chris Corin restores two Old Bolsheviks to their rightful places in Soviet History.

In the Iraq war a radical Muslim group claimed that they prefer to attack black American soldiers, because ‘To have Negroes occupying us is a particular humiliation....

Following our article in November about Thomas Cochrane’s plans for chemical warfare, Richard Dale, author of a new book on Cochrane, reveals how the maverick...

In welcoming a new publication of the collected numbers of The Wipers Times, Malcolm Brown wonders why we find the idea of humour in the trenches so shocking.


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