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Volume: 55 Issue: 6

Contents of History Today, June 2005

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Richard Cavendish explains how Archbishop Scrope and Thomas Mowbray were executed on June 8th, 1405.

Richard Cavendish charts the life of the Italian nationalist Guiseppe Mazzini.

To coincide with a major new exhibition at Tate Britain on the painter Sir Joshua Reynolds, Stella Tillyard asks what fame meant to individuals and the wider...

Tim Harris explores the political spin, intolerance and repression that underlay Charles II’s relaxed image, and which led him into a deep crisis in 1678-81 yet...

Roland Quinault examines the career, speeches and writings of Churchill for evidence as to whether or not he was racist and patronizing to black peoples.

Donald Zec has written the life of his brother, the wartime political cartoonist Philip Zec, to remind the world of his rich collection of cartoons that caught the...

Jonathan Fenby asks why the greatest maritime tragedy ever to affect Britain was hushed up at the time and has remained a virtually untold story for sixty-five years...

Peter Furtado reviews Ridley Scott's new Crusades epic.

Letters from readers of History Today.

Stuart Burch considers the significance to Norway – both in terms of the past and the present – of the anniversary of 1905, when the country at last won its...

Ninety years ago this summer saw the start of the Armenian genocide in Turkey. In his account of the complex historical background to these events Donald Bloxham...

Murray Watson looks at the historical roots of a phenomenon few commentators have noted: the sizeable English presence in Scotland.

Ian Bottomley introduces an exhibition which reflects a special moment in Anglo-Japanese relations in the 17th century, echoed today by a unique loan arrangement...

Bryan Ward-Perkins finds that archaeology offers unarguable evidence for an abrupt ending.

Peter Furtado introduces the June 2005 issue of History Today.

A rebellion erupted on the Russian battleship Potemkin on June 14th, 1905

Jonathan Marwil describes the eye-opening experience of three young Americans who went to report from the battlefields of the Italian War of Independence.

Charlotte Crow visits the new World Museum Liverpool, which has been newly refurbished in time for the city’s big year, 2008, when it will wear the mantle of...

Lawrence Freedman describes how he came to write the official history of the Falklands campaign and tells us what he learned from the experience.


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