Mullocks Auctions

Issue 34 September 1999

Martin McCauley reviews Stalin's foreign policy, paying special attention to his covert involvement in the Korean war. He shows that, despite short-term successes, his record can be seen as one of long-term failure.

Keith Randell, the founder of the Acress to History series, demonstrates that there is virtually no occasion in life when the study of History is irrelevant.

In this edited version of a lecture given on 25 March 1999, to commemorate the anniversary of Cromwell's birth, John Morrill provides us with a series of snapshots, at different ages, of the troubled visionary who aspired to lead a new chosen people out of the bondage of Stuart tyranny.

In an inimitable review of the last 160 years of party politics, Richard Kelley argues that the Conservative party is like a marriage that has gone wrong.

Robert Tombs explains why the Paris Commune of 1871, which ended with the most ferocious outbreak of civil violence in 19th century Europe, is still a subject of intense historical interest and controversy.

Roger Lockyer takes a fresh look at the much-maligned James VI of Scotland, who became the first Stuart king of England.

Ben Gray analyses the career and estimates the importance of the trade union leader who organised the Great Dockers' Strike of 1889.

Ivan Roots examines the latest research on Philip II of Spain.

Andrew Matthews examines three new books on key themes in modern history.  

William D. Rubinstein takes issue with the argument that Britain could have done more to prevent the Holocaust.