Who's Who

Road to the Great War

By John Terraine

The supreme direction of the First World War has remained a matter of controversy; in this essay, John Terraine contrasts Lloyd George’s hopes with the manner of their realization.

By Allan Mallinson

As Home Secretary in 1911 Winston Churchill intervened in a debate about Britain’s role in a future European conflict. His observations were remarkably prescient and, had they been implemented, might have shortened the First World War, says Allan Mallinson.

By John Stocks Powell

John Stocks Powell describes how conflict between Nationalists and Unionists was still unhealed when the First World War began.

By Ian F.W. Beckett

The entry of Turkey into the First World War may have extended the conflict by as much as two years. It certainly changed the country forever. Yet the advent of war was marked by confusion, uncertainty and shifting alliances, says Ian F.W. Beckett.

By Paul Reynolds

Few foresaw the horror of the First World War. The financier Jan Bloch did and he outlined his vision to Britain’s military establishment, as Paul Reynolds explains.

By Dan Whitaker

The German First World War commander Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck has been described as the 20th century’s greatest guerrilla leader for his undefeated campaign in East Africa. Is the legend justified? Dan Whitaker considers the wider picture.

By Richard C. Hall

Richard C. Hall looks at the bloody conflicts in south-eastern Europe which became the blueprint for a century of conflict in the region.

By William Mulligan

By reinterpreting the years before 1914 William Mulligan sees the 'July Crisis' in a fresh perspective.

By Paul Brewer

Paul Brewer looks at the politics behind US involvement in the First World War and how President Woodrow Wilson dealt with those Americans who campaigned against it.

By Stephen Roberts

Stephen Roberts explodes a popular historical over-simplification.

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