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First World War

1914-18 Global conflict that began with the assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the throne of Austria-Hungary, by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo. Austria declared war on... read more
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EDITOR'S CHOICE

Peter Furtado introduces one of the most traumatic places in British military history.

The First World War provided unprecedented opportunities for scientists, especially women, says Patricia Fara.

Volume: 64 Issue: 2 2014

As a peacetime premier Herbert Asquith was held in high regard, but the First World War undid his reputation. That is an unfair judgment, argues Roland Quinault.

Volume: 64 Issue: 5 2014

Roderick Barman examines the circumstances surrounding Brazil’s entry into the Great War and appraises the conflict’s legacy on the developing nation.

Volume: 64 Issue: 3 2014

Chris Wrigley explores the hugely beneficial impact of the First World War on the British tobacco industry and looks at how smoking became an approved symbol of comradeship and patriotism.

Volume: 64 Issue: 4 2014

As commemorations of the outbreak of the First World War get underway, Stephen Cooper offers an overview of the often fierce debate among British historians about the conduct and course of the conflict over the last hundred years.

Volume: 64 Issue: 3 2014

Life in a First World War field hospital is depicted in a new exhibition.

Volume: 64 Issue: 3 2014

The most desirable tourist destination of belle époque Europe, Venice became a major naval base during the First World War. Richard Bosworth looks at how La serenissima dealt with the years of peril during which it became a target of enemy bombers.

Volume: 64 Issue: 1 2014

During the First World War, the Nobel Prize-winning scientist William Lawrence Bragg devised a system to locate enemy guns, which made a dramatic impact on the Allied war effort and beyond, says Taylor Downing.

Volume: 63 Issue: 12 2013

As Home Secretary in 1911 Winston Churchill intervened in a debate about Britain’s role in a future European conflict. His observations were remarkably prescient and, had they been implemented, might have shortened the First World War, says Allan Mallinson.

Volume: 63 Issue: 12 2013

The author of Whisky Galore played an active role in the Great War, experiencing both the horror of the Dardanelles in 1915 and the intrigues of wartime Athens. Yet his diplomatic ham-fistedness forced his premature exit. Richard Hughes explains. 

Volume: 63 Issue: 8 2013

Peering through the pines, a German cycle company of the First World War is captured on camera. Roger Hudson explains.

Volume: 63 Issue: 6 2013

The First World War precipitated a housing crisis in London, which affected all classes of the populace and had a profound effect on the capital, says Jerry White.

Volume: 63 Issue: 11 2013

The year 1913 marked a resurgence for the Russian empire as the Romanov dynasty celebrated its 300th anniversary and the economy boomed. Had it not been for the First World War the country’s fortunes might have taken a very different turn, says Charles Emmerson.

Volume: 63 Issue: 10 2013

The Daily Mail has recently caused controversy with its views on patriotism. Adrian Bingham looks back at a time when the newspaper’s belief in its national duty provoked intense debate and copies were burnt in the City of London.

Volume: 63 Issue: 12 2013

It is time to ditch the Blackadder view of history, says Gary Sheffield. Britain was right to fight Imperial Germany in 1914.

Volume: 63 Issue: 8 2013

Few foresaw the horror of the First World War. The financier Jan Bloch did and he outlined his vision to Britain’s military establishment, as Paul Reynolds explains.

Volume: 63 Issue: 5 2013

The German First World War commander Paul von Lettow-Vorbeck has been described as the 20th century’s greatest guerrilla leader for his undefeated campaign in East Africa. Is the legend justified? Dan Whitaker considers the wider picture.

Volume: 63 Issue: 2 2013

The entry of Turkey into the First World War may have extended the conflict by as much as two years. It certainly changed the country forever. Yet the advent of war was marked by confusion, uncertainty and shifting alliances, says Ian F.W. Beckett.

Volume: 63 Issue: 6 2013

Richard C. Hall looks at the bloody conflicts in south-eastern Europe which became the blueprint for a century of conflict in the region.

Volume: 62 Issue: 11 2012

Humiliating, painful and reminiscent of crucifixion, the British army’s Field Punishment No 1 fuelled public outrage during the First World War, as Clive Emsley explains.

Volume: 62 Issue: 11 2012

Panikos Panayi explores attitudes to German prisoners interned during the First World War.

Volume: 62 Issue: 11 2012

The Treaty of Versailles, negotiated by the fractious Allies in the wake of the First World War, did not crush Germany, nor did it bring her back into the family of nations. Antony Lentin examines a tortuous process that sowed the seeds of further conflict.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

With the New Year release of Steven Spielberg’s film adaptation of Michael Morpurgo’s War Horse Gervase Phillips explores the true story of the horses and mules that served the British army during the First World War.

Volume: 62 Issue: 1 2012

King George V and Kaiser Wilhelm II pose together in 1912. However, the Kaiser had mixed feelings towards Britain and the First World War broke out two years later.

Volume: 61 Issue: 12 2011

By reinterpreting the years before 1914 William Mulligan sees the 'July Crisis' in a fresh perspective.

Issue: 69 2011

Tim Grady on postwar Germany’s attempts to remember the contribution made by its Jewish combatants in the First World War.

Volume: 61 Issue: 11 2011

Inspired by the discovery of the frozen bodies of three soldiers of the First World War, Peter Englund considers the ways we remember and write about a conflict of which there are now no survivors left.

Volume: 61 Issue: 11 2011

Before the First World War, Irish Unionists and Nationalists were poised to fight each other over the imposition of Home Rule by the British. Then, remarkably, they fought and died side by side, writes Richard S. Grayson.

Volume: 60 Issue: 7 2010

A cremation ghat built in Brighton for Indian soldiers who fought in the First World War has recently been inscribed with their names, writes Rosie Llewellyn-Jones.

Volume: 60 Issue: 10 2010

Louise de Bettignies assisted the Allies in the Great War by establishing a vital information network in northern France. Patricia Stoughton recounts her extraordinary bravery.

Volume: 60 Issue: 7 2010

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